The Rimé Movement

The Rimé View is most often connected with the great masters of the 19th century Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo and Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Thaye. The movement that they popularised was however deeply rooted in the work of previous masters.

In the early 16th century, the great master Jonang Kunga Drolchok laid the foundations for the Rimé movement when he travelled extensively throughout many regions, gathering and practicing a wide variety of transmissions, empowerments and pith instructions. He collected these into his great work “The Hundred Teachings of Drolchok” (dolchok tridgya).

Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye
Pioneer of the Rimé Philosophy in Eastern Tibet.

Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye
Pioneer of the Rimé Philosophy in Eastern Tibet.

Then in the late 16th century, Kunga Drolchok’s reincarnation Kyabdak Drolway Gonpo (Jetsun Taranatha), continued his non-sectarian work by searching out and gathering the transmissions of many nearly extinct lineages. In particular, he placed particular emphasis in preserving the teachings of the Shangpa Kagyu, whose teachings survive to this day due to his efforts.

Khyentse Wangpo and Jamgön Kongtrul further expanded on this work by propagating the teachings widely and publishing many volumes of teachings and commentaries. Jamgön Kongtrul, who is believed to be the reincarnation of Taranatha, was responsible for authoring five treatises known as “The Five Treasuries”. These incredibly vast and comprehensive volumes present a wide range of the teachings, empowerments and rituals of the wisdom traditions developed in Tibet.